Autumn and winter home trends to watch in 2021

Achieve this season’s most stylish looks with our guide to emerging interior decor trends

This sophisticated trend focuses on shapes rather than colours, so you can keep your scheme light and neutral, and let your décor take centre stage Fluted Ivy two-seater in Velluto Anthracite/Grey mix, £899; Mia blush scatter cushion, £35; Moonstruck scatter cushion, £35; Kingsley large rug, £399; Angle side table, £379, all Sofology

As we head into the cooler months, it’s time, once again, to retreat into our homes and make them feel as comfortable as possible – and by keeping up with the latest looks, you can surround yourselves with style to keep you content all winter long.

Advertisement

For AW21, we’ve pulled together all the trends and colours that are set to be popular – and, with looks ranging from ‘Back to the Seventies’ retro style to Goblincore, you’re bound to find something to suit your taste.

Keep reading to discover these trends in detail and decide which one you’ll embrace this season…

And for more inspiration, check out our guide to the looks we’re loving right now!

Autumn and winter home decor trends 2021

Seventies inspired

The Seventies is a decade that keeps coming back to the present day – and for good reason. Rich mustard and orange tones bring warmth into our homes when we need it most and those distinct retro patterns instantly add character to any space.

Layer velvet cushions and soft rugs in this season’s colours to create a cosy look
Layer velvet cushions and soft rugs in this season’s colours to create a cosy look. Image credit: Habitat

If you like the look of this trend but are hesitant to pick up a bright paint brush, start small by adding in a few key pieces such as a statement upholstered chair, a few scattered cushions, or a couple of nostalgic accessories.

Don’t be afraid to go bold when it comes to this trend – opt for a statement wall or floor and use similar colours throughout your scheme for a cohesive look Soho Kingston Stripes carpet, £44.99 per sq m, Carpetright
Don’t be afraid to go bold when it comes to this trend – opt for a statement wall or floor and use similar colours throughout your scheme for a cohesive look. Image credit: Carpetright

Ready to go all out? Opt for a feature wall in a funky pattern for real wow-factor, and pair with equally bold accessories.

‘This trend is about bringing warming shades into the darkest months of the year with hot flashes of colour such as orange, deep red and burgundy, for a real fireside feel’ explains Jemma Dayman, Carpets Buyer for Carpetright.

Rich, deep red tones can overwhelm a space. Counteract this by balancing out with light woodwork and complementary colours
Rich, deep red tones can overwhelm a space. Counteract this by balancing out with light woodwork and complementary colours. Image credit: Benjamin Moore

‘Colour can transform both your space and mood, with a bright palette offering an instant feel-good factor’ she adds. ‘This look works equally well in contemporary spaces or period homes, and bolder is always better.’

Goblincore

Often referred to as Cottagecore’s cool, older sister, goblincore is a grungy aesthetic based around the notion of appreciating the ugly aspects of nature. While cottagecore décor schemes will see lots of pretty florals, botanical touches and vintage pastel shades, a typical goblincore look will have an edgier woodland feel – think earth tones, mossy shades, snails and mushrooms.

The Deer Stalker wallpaper, £175 for three rolls; Flourish lamp shade in Sienna, £160, with Ulpia table lamp, £259, all Mindthegap
The Deer Stalker wallpaper, £175 for three rolls; Flourish lamp shade in Sienna, £160, with Ulpia table lamp, £259, all Mindthegap

Sometimes referred to as modern folk style, a goblincore scheme has a naturally eclectic look, so it’s ideal for rough-and-tumble homes where you don’t want things to look too perfect. See our guide to cluttercore for more ideas about embracing organised chaos!

Draper 3-seater sofa, £1,699; plain wool throw in peacock, £80; flora & fauna cushion,£45; willow garden cushion in graphite, £45, all John Lewis & Partners
Draper 3-seater sofa, £1,699; plain wool throw in peacock, £80; flora & fauna cushion,£45; willow garden cushion in graphite, £45, all John Lewis & Partners

The key to creating this look is to combine a selection of highly detailed, intricate prints in differing scales but similar colours. Olive, earth and moss colours work particularly well, and look out for trailing or tangled leaf motifs.

Give the look a tactile element with embroidered pieces – you can easily make these yourself by using a simple running stitch to outline a straightforward motif like an oak leaf, or mushroom.

Vertical lines

From panelling to headboards, and even stripy patterned wallpaper, vertical lines and fluted finishes are coming back through in lots of furniture and décor this autumn.

This sophisticated trend focuses on shapes rather than colours, so you can keep your scheme light and neutral, and let your décor take centre stage Fluted Ivy two-seater in Velluto Anthracite/Grey mix, £899; Mia blush scatter cushion, £35; Moonstruck scatter cushion, £35; Kingsley large rug, £399; Angle side table, £379, all Sofology
This sophisticated trend focuses on shapes rather than colours, so you can keep your scheme light and neutral, and let your décor take centre stage. Image credit: Sofology

This trend is less about the colours and more about the shapes and textures you can create with lines, which means you can incorporate the style into your existing scheme with the addition of ribbed glassware, fluted furniture and striped accessories.

Fluted finishes are forever associated with art deco glamour, instantly creating a luxurious look in your home Oversized Hotel headboard, from £199; Hotel Finley tripod table lamp in silver, £45; Logan bedside table, £169; Hotel Egyptian cotton silver stripe duvet cover, from £25; Hotel Bubble stem flute glasses, £18 for a set of four, all Dunelm
Fluted finishes are forever associated with art deco glamour, instantly creating a luxurious look in your home. Image credit: Dunelm

If you’re starting from scratch, stick to a neutral backdrop for a sophisticated look and let the details do the talking. The Art Deco movement really embraced fluted shapes, so it’s easy to lean into a glamorous look with this trend by pairing with gorgeous gold and luxe marbles.

Fluted finishes add texture and depth to a space. Pair with luxurious materials such as brass and marble for a luxury look Black Flute marble media unit, £549, Atkin & Thyme
Fluted finishes add texture and depth to a space. Pair with luxurious materials such as brass and marble for a luxury look. Image credit: Atkin & Thyme

‘As we transition from the warmer months to the autumn and winter seasons, our décor becomes increasingly layered and deep in textures’ explains Victoria Atkin, co-founder of Atkin and Thyme. ‘Fluted furniture calls back to the classic architectural grooves of Grecian pillars and Art Deco geometrics, giving pieces timeless elegance. Fluted designs are chameleons – using bold colours and metallic accents will evoke a more industrial effect.’

Ice inspired

Welcoming the sharp, icy shapes and cool tones of the season can transform your home into a chic winter wonderland. Light-play is the key element to this trend.

Really embrace this crystalising trend by creating a feature wall with a mural Lilac Ripple wall mural by Lara Skinner, £35 per sq m, Wallsauce
Really embrace this crystalising trend by creating a feature wall with a mural. Image credit: Wallsauce

An iridescent palette of light greys, blues and lilacs set the backdrop, creating a sense of calmness and clarity, while reflective glassware and classic chrome finishes add glamorous detail and allow light to bounce around the space for a little enchantment at this time of year.

Add depth to cool tones by combining with streaks of dark teal and reflective chrome finishes
Add depth to cool tones by combining with streaks of dark teal and reflective chrome finishes. Image credit: Crown Paints

To stop your scheme becoming too stark, create depth with a few key darker tones, such as teal and charcoal, and soft furnishings in stylish geometric patterns.

Tones such as lilac, white and teal combine well and mirror the iridescent colours found in reflective glass Sofology Castille sofa in Teal Mix, £1,199, Sofology
Tones such as lilac, white and teal combine well and mirror the iridescent colours found in reflective glass. Image credit: Sofology

‘This is a trend all about light, transparency and reflection’ explains Judy Smith, Colour Consultant for Crown Paints. ‘Sharp edges and crisp shards of colour where lines and angles meet echo what happens when light is refracted. Materials are glass, mirror and metal – anything that has a shine or lustre for a sleek, polished look. Inspired by these surfaces, colours include soft luminous blues that reflect light balanced by deeper navy, teal and charcoal.’

Peachy pinks

‘It may not be the first Autumnal colour that springs to mind, but tranquil, chalky pink shades will continue to be a popular decorative choice in British homes as we approach the colder months’ explain the colour experts at Hillary’s.

pink bedroom ideas - habitat bed
If you don’t want to commit to fully pink walls, add a pink feature panel behind your headboard to add drama and interest to your room. Add rattan accessories to finish the look. Image credit: Habitat

‘When paired with mossy greens and olive tones, pinky peach shades can induce a feeling of relaxation and transform your home a luxe retreat’ they added.

Toblino Table Lamp, £45, Made.com
Pair apricot-toned pink with olive green and light wooden finishes for a springlike feel in your bedroom. Image credit: Made.com
Advertisement

‘Hailed the new millennial pink, Peach is an unconventional colour choice we expect to see in homes this season and through the upcoming year’ add the interior experts at Sweetpea and Willow. ‘This lovely, playful colour provides refreshing contrast from the darker tones more commonly associated with Autumn and Winter.’