What's the difference between ceramic and porcelain tiles and which are best for a bathroom?

Don't know whether to go with ceramic or porcelain tiles in your bathroom? Kamila Chalfin, from the Tile Giant, has this advice

What's the difference between ceramic and porcelain tiles and which are best for a bathroom?
Published: December 15, 2021 at 12:33 pm
First 5 issues for £5 when you subscribe to Your Home Magazine or Homestyle Magazine!

Choosing between ceramic and porcelain tiles depends on how you plan to use the tiles in the bathroom and the overall look you want to achieve. Before you start any tiling project, it’s really useful to understand the differences between the two materials.

Advertisement

Porcelain tiles are fired at higher temperatures, producing a highly durable tile. Not only do porcelain tiles deliver a stunning natural finish, they absorb less water so are ideal for bathrooms. Porcelain tiles can be more difficult to cut, which is something to bear in mind if you’re planning to do the job yourself.

Ceramic tiles are also available in a wide range of colours, sizes and finishes to suit walls and floors but can chip when something heavy is dropped on them. We recommend choosing ceramic tiles for your walls and porcelain for your bathroom floor for a long-lasting finish.

Easy to clean and maintain, the use of inkjet printing has transformed the styles now on offer, making it possible for you to easily bring the look of wood, concrete and marble to your bathroom for less, with a wide range of ceramic and porcelain tile options.

How to lay porcelain tiles

Abbas Youssefi, Co-Founder at Porcelain Superstore, says…

When it comes to laying tiles, porcelain can be a little more challenging than ceramic, so if you can afford to, hire a professional for a seamless result.

If you want to do it yourself, preparation is key. Ensure your sub-floor – the timber or concrete you’re tiling onto – is completely stable and flat. Hire a dedicated tile cutter if you don’t already have one. A dry cutter is perfect for quick, straight cuts with no mess, while a wet cutter is suited for trickier cuts. Buy diamond-tipped blades for flawless cuts.

Start tiling in the centre of the room and work out towards the walls. Check each tile with a spirit level and use a rubber mallet to level. Opt for a slow-setting adhesive to give you more working time and refit any tiles you’re unhappy with. And make sure to wear knee-pads – you’ll thank us later!

Not sure what colour to go for in your bathroom? Check out our different colour schemes for inspiration and ideas 

Find more bathroom ideas and inspiration and take a look at our makeover section for real home transformations

Advertisement

Top Image: Getty Images

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Sponsored content